Body Scoring Chart

Descriptions of Horse Body Condition Scores on the Henneke Scale[4]

Score

Description

1. Poor

Extremely emaciated; no fatty tissue; vertebrae, ribs, tail head, and bones of withers, shoulder, and neck are visible

2. Very Thin

Emaciated; slight tissue cover over bones; vertebrae, ribs, tail head, and bones of withers, shoulder, and neck are visible

3. Thin

Slight fat cover over body; individual vertebrae and ribs no longer visibly discernible; withers, shoulders, and neck do not appear overly thin

4. Moderately Thin

Ridge of spine and outline of ribs are visible; tail head may or may not be visible depending on the breed; withers, shoulders, and neck do not appear overly thin

5. Moderate

Spine and ribs cannot be seen however ribs can be felt; tail head is spongy; withers, shoulders, and neck are rounded and smooth

6. Moderately Fleshy

Slight crease down spine; ribs and tail head feel spongy; fat deposits along withers and neck and behind shoulders

7. Fleshy

Crease down spine; ribs have fat filling between them; tail head spongy; fat deposits along withers and neck and behind shoulders

8. Fat

Apparent crease down spine; ribs difficult to feel; soft fat surrounding tail head; fat deposits along withers, behind shoulders, and on inner thighs; neck is large

9. Extremely Fat

Obvious crease down spine; patchy fat on ribs; bulging fat on tail head, withers, behind shoulders, and on neck; fat fills in flank and on inner thighs

Ideal scores

The average horse is healthiest with a body condition score between 4 and 6, which indicates that the horse has a proper balance of feed to exercise.[5]  An Easy keeper or hard keeper should be watched closely as they are prone to either being overweight or underweight, respectively.

Breeding Mares

Breeding mares with a body condition score less than five have been linked in research to problems with reproduction. The energy demands of milk production for a foal are very high, so most mares will lose condition while lactating.[2] Also, a mare with a body condition score less than five will have more difficulty conceiving.[2] For these reasons, recommendations are for breeding mares to score between 6 and 7. Higher body condition scores have not been shown to affect reproduction but are unhealthy for the horse.[2]

Stallions

Stallions have the best reproductive success at a body condition score of 5 or 6.[6] Stallions have a high energy output during breeding season so some advise a stallion begin the breeding season at a 6 or 7 [2] to keep him within the healthy range at the end of the breeding season. If a stallion has a body condition score less than 3 or greater than 8, reproductive performance is compromised.[6]

Performance Horses

There has not been much research on the connection between body condition score and performance ability in horses so optimum scores are unknown.[2] However, horses with a low body condition score lack the fat reserves for strenuous work and also may lack lean muscle.[7] Horses with high body condition score carry too much weight, which interferes with stamina and biomechanics.

Horses on Winter Pasture

Horses on pasture should enter the winter season at a body condition score of 6 or 7. On extremely cold days, a horse cannot eat enough food to balance the energy requirements of maintaining body heat so condition is often lost over winter.

References

  1. “Relationship between condition score, physical measurements and body fat percentage in mares”. Equine Vet: 371–2. 1983 Oct.
  2.  Body Condition Scoring your Horse Retrieved 2012-03-21
  3. Habitat for horses, Henneke Body Condition Scoring table including photos Retrieved 2009-11-3
  4. Novak, Susan; Anna Kate Shoveller (2008). “Evaluating your Horse’s Condition”. In Ken Blackley. Nutrition and Feeding Management for Horse Owners. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development. pp. 1–3. ISBN 0-7732-6078-1.
  5. Introduction to Body Condition Scoring Horses Retrieved 2012-03-21
  6. Novak, Susan; Anna Kate Shoveller (2008). “Feeding Management”. In Ken Blackley. Nutrition and Feeding Management for Horse Owners. Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development. pp. 71–91. ISBN 0-7732-6078-1.
  7. “Relationship of body condition score to completion rate during 160 km endurance races”. Equine Veterinary: 591–595. 1999 July.

 

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